Many people at Okaw Valley Elementary in Bethany know Timothy Moon from his playground and custodial duties.

But when he's not working at the school, the Rev. Timothy Moon keeps busy as senior pastor at Dalton City Christian Church. He also serves as chaplain at a campground run by Lake Shelbyville Ministries.

Moon said being a minister for the past 20 years has always seemed liked a second part-time job.

"Ideally, I would like to work full time at a church," Moon said, "but this is where God has led me."

Out of necessity, many church leaders have to split their time between serving their church and working another full-time job.

The Rev. Stacey Brohard of Crestview Christian Church in Decatur has always juggled two careers - one as a minister and the other as an engineer making parts for railroad cars.

Brohard worked for TrinityRail as a mechanical engineer until he was transferred to Georgia.

While in Georgia, he continued his engineering job while attending Covington Theological Seminary and serving as a youth minister at a church there.

Five years ago, Brohard quit his job and returned to Decatur to be pastor at Crestview.

"I was giving my time to God as a lay minister, but the last thing I gave up was my finances to God," he said.

Crestview Christian was down to 25 members and not in sound financial shape. Brohard said he was concerned about the church being able to pay its bills, let alone being able to give him a salary.

So, in 2007, Brohard decided to purchase Up-N-Runnin', a lawn and garden service and retail shop off Mound Road. He only works at the shop two days a week alongside his two full-time employees.

He admits the business has helped supplement his income.

"It keeps me in front-line

ministry," Brohard said, "and it's a good stress release for me to get out and work with my hands."

The Rev. Byron Hansbro of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church in Decatur has always done double duty serving God and working as an attorney for State Farm in Bloomington since 2006.

Hansbro took over as interim pastor when the Rev. Oliver Johnson died.

"It's all about organization and trust," Hansbro said about.;having dedicated officers of the church who take on a lot of responsibility.

But he never misses leading Bible study on Wednesday evenings, preaching a sermon on Sundays and meeting the needs of his church members.

And everyone at the church has his cell phone number when emergencies arise, he said.

"When you look at the early church model, the Bible shows where Paul himself worked during his ministry. He worked alongside others to take care of himself. Jesus also worked as a tent builder/carpenter,".;Hansbro said.

Hansbro said that being bi-vocational doesn't make him choose one career over the other, but it shows that a person can do multiple tasks.

The Rev. Pam Bradford enjoys shuffling her pastoral duties between two churches, Long Creek United Methodist Church and Dalton City United Methodist Church.

Unfortunately, Bradford's biggest problem is not.;being able to be at both churches during Sunday school because of the travel time. She does make up for it by having fellowship time with members after worship service.

The Long Creek church averages around 100 in attendance during Sunday worship, and Dalton City usually has around 30.

"I love the people at both churches, and they are so in tuned in doing God's work because his hand is upon them," Bradford said.

However, some pastors decide to take a leap of faith and quit their second careers to focus on their ministry.

With today's shaky economy, the Rev. Courtney Watson admits it is probably "the dumbest time" to leave his job at Archer Daniels Midland Co. But it's also the best time in his budding career as a minister.

"God was saying it's not about how comfortable you are but how much are you willing to serve me and what extent are you willing to go," Watson said.

Last week, Watson finished his last day on the job as a process control engineer at ADM. He has worked there since 1999.

He packed up his wife, Jolene, and sons, Courtney Jeremiah, 2, and Josiah, 7 months, and headed to Danville to be the full-time pastor at Philadelphia Missionary Baptist Church.

For the past two years, Watson has been traveling back and forth from Decatur to preach at the Danville church.

"Preaching was something that I never sat down and said that I wanted to do," Watson said, but he accepted his calling into the ministry in 2003.

Now that Watson has left his career at ADM, he refers to the verses, Philippians 4:11-13.

"Know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation¦. I can do everything through Him who strengthens me."

Watson said he hopes to eventually find a job in Danville to supplement his income because he realizes the small congregation at Philadelphia Missionary Baptist can't provide him with a salary that will be enough to support his family.

"There is no personal benefit for us going (and moving to Danville). We may lose out on some earthly things but will be storing treasures in heaven," Watson said.

sheilas@herald-review.com|421-7963

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