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Ratings by the Motion Picture Association of America are: (G) for general audiences; (PG) parental guidance urged because of material possibly unsuitable for children; (PG-13) parents are strongly cautioned to give guidance for attendance of children younger than 13; (R) restricted, younger than 17 admitted only with parent or adult guardian; (NC-17) no one 17 and younger admitted.

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(Critics’ Choices capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Justin Chang (J.C.) and other reviewers. Openings compiled by Kevin Crust.)

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OPENING IN HOLLYWOOD THIS WEEK

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“A Ciambra” — Italian coming-of-age drama with Pio Amato. Directed by Jonas Carpignano. Italy’s Oscar submission.

“American Folk” — Road drama directed by David Heinz.

“Bucky & the Squirrels” — Music mockumentary directed by Allen Katz.

“The Campus” — Horror directed by J. Horton.

“The Clapper” — Romantic comedy with Ed Helms, Amanda Seyfried, Tracy Morgan. Written and directed by Dito Montiel.

“Desolation” — Thriller with Dominik Garcia-Lorido, Brock Kelly. Directed by David Moscow.

“A Futile and Stupid Gesture” — Comedy biopic of National Lampoon’s Doug Kenney with Will Forte. Directed by David Wain.

“Kickboxer: Retaliation” — Action adventure with Alain Moussi.

“Like Me” — Thriller directed by Robert Mockler.

“Lover for a Day” — French drama with Eric Caravaca, Esther Garrel. Directed by Philippe Garrel.

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” — Action adventure with Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario, Thomas Brodie-Sangster. Directed by Wes Ball.

“The Misguided” — Australian drama with Caleb Galati, Katherine Langford.

“The Neighbor” — Dramatic thriller with William Fichtner.

“Padman” — Indian comedy-drama directed by R. Balki.

“Please Stand By” — Drama with Dakota Fanning, Toni Colette, Alice Eve. Directed by Ben Lewin.

“Vazante” — Brazilian drama directed by Daniela Thomas.

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CRITICS’ CHOICES

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“Call Me By Your Name” — Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer give superb performances as two young men falling in love in the northern Italian countryside in this rapturously beautiful collaboration between director Luca Guadagnino and screenwriter James Ivory. (J.C.) R.

“The Disaster Artist” — James Franco’s shrewd, affectionate and frequently hilarious comedy re-creates and deconstructs the making of Tommy Wiseau’s cult landmark “The Room,” with Franco giving a fully committed, even haunted performance as Wiseau. (J.C.) R

“Hostiles” — Written and directed by Scott Cooper and powered by a dynamic trio of interwoven performances by Christian Bale, Wes Studi and Rosamund Pike, this latest example of the Western revival grabs you by the throat and holds on for the duration. (K.Tu.) R.

“Lady Bird” — As warm as it is smart, and it is very smart, this portrait of a high school senior year marks actor-screenwriter Greta Gerwig’s superb debut as a solo director and yet another astonishing performance by star Saoirse Ronan. (K.Tu.) R.

“Paddington 2” — Everyone's favorite Peruvian-born, London-based bear is back, this time facing off against a nefarious stage actor (Hugh Grant) in this beautifully structured and executed comedy from director/co-writer Paul King. (J.C.) PG.

“The Post” — Director Steven Spielberg and stars Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks combine for a thriller cum civics lesson showing the value of newspapers hanging together and holding government accountable for deception. (K.Tu.) PG-13.

“The Shape of Water” — Magical, thrilling and romantic to the core, a sensual and fantastical “Beauty and the Beast” tale with moral overtones, Guillermo del Toro’s film plays by all the rules and none of them, going its own way with fierce abandon. (K.Tu.) R.

“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” — Building and improving on “The Force Awakens,” writer-director Rian Johnson’s grand space opera is the first flat-out terrific “Star Wars” movie since “The Empire Strikes Back,” full of dramatic echoes of George Lucas’ original trilogy but also rich in surprise and imagination. (J.C.) PG-13.

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — Uncommon writer-director Martin McDonagh and a splendid cast top-lined by Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell present a savage film, even a dangerous one, the blackest take-no-prisoners farce in quite some time. (K.Tu.) R.

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©2018 Los Angeles Times

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