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Jury acquits Mount Zion man of attempted murder, convicts on 3 firearms charges
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Jury acquits Mount Zion man of attempted murder, convicts on 3 firearms charges

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Casey T. Wiley

Casey T. Wiley, accused of terrorizing his mother and shooting at her, was acquitted of attempted murder, armed violence, armed robbery and aggravated battery and one count of aggravated discharge of a firearm. But the jurors also found him guilty of three counts of aggravated unlawful use of a shotgun, rifle and handgun. READ MORE

DECATUR — Casey T. Wiley, the Mount Zion man accused of terrorizing his mother and shooting at her, was acquitted of attempted murder after a three-day trial.

Wiley, 31, was also found not guilty of armed violence, armed robbery and aggravated battery and one count of aggravated discharge of a firearm.

But the jurors also found him guilty of three counts of aggravated unlawful use of a shotgun, rifle and handgun. Judge James Coryell scheduled a hearing for sentencing and post-trial motions Jan. 24. Wiley remains in custody in the Macon County Jail, where he’s been held since June of 2018.

The Macon County Circuit Court jury had retired to consider the case at 2:59 p.m. Tuesday and, after asking one question of the judge at 5:09 p.m and another at 11:07 a.m. Wednesday, returned with their verdicts 13 minutes later.

Assistant Macon County State Attorneys Regan Radtke and Timothy Tighe had told jurors the case dated to June 21, 2018, when a drunken and enraged Wiley had shown up his mother’s house in the early morning hours pressing a gun to her head and slapping her face.

The now 64-year-old mother had eventually fled her home at 5 a.m. and sought help from her ex-husband, Wiley’s father, who lived nearby. The two of them fled in the father’s car at high speed toward Decatur with, the prosecution said, Wiley in hot pursuit.

He crashed on the way and was arrested after police cornered him near Lake Decatur. Radtke said a bullet fired by Wiley had been dug out of the father’s car, lodged within 18 inches of the headrest where his mother sat.

But in his opening for the defense, attorney Andrew M. Wessler reminded jurors that what prosecutors alleged was not proof: “You get to decide what it (the evidence) says ... listen to the evidence, decide this case based on the evidence and, when you do that, your verdict will be not guilty.”

Wiley wrote a letter to the Herald & Review from his jail cell saying he was afflicted from “adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and also had a “bad drinking problem.”

He said he wanted a fair hearing and was a worthwhile person who had suffered setbacks. “I don’t care what anybody says about me, I’m a stand-up guy and I want to deal with this (the charges) in the open in court.”

Wiley particularly objected to being shackled to the floor in court. Judge Coryell had cloth screens taped around the table where Wiley sat with his lawyer so the jury could not see the shackles and be influenced by them.


Contact Tony Reid at (217) 421-7977. Follow him on Twitter: @TonyJReid

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