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LettersEditor

I like political satire, but cartoons are no substitute for coverage of the issues. The Herald & Review has reprinted Associated Press coverage of Venezuela and political cartoons that support the coup being attempted by Juan Guaidó against the legitimately-elected, constitutional government of President Nicolás Maduro, but has not provided the fact-based coverage we deserve.

You should report the fact that the Venezuelan constitution does not give Guaidó the right to declare himself the president. Article 233 of the Venezuelan constitution says that an interim president would be needed in the case of a “falta absoluta” (void) in the presidency due to death, insanity, or absence. In case of such a void, the vice president takes over and, then, an election must be held within 30 days. The head of the Venezuelan National Assembly has no constitutional right to fulfill this interim role.

United States policy reflects greater interest in Venezuelan oil reserves — the largest in the world, larger even than Saudi Arabia — than a genuine concern for democracy. Recently, John Bolton in an interview on the Fox Business Network said, “It will make a big difference to the United States economically if we could have American oil companies really invest in and produce the oil capabilities in Venezuela.”

Coup-mongering in Venezuela means the U.S. government is working for the fossil fuel industry, not the best interests of the people of the United States or Venezuela. 

Catherine Stanford, Decatur

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